Loading...
Ачааллаж байна...

Google warns Glass wearers: Quit being 'CREEPY GLASSHOLES'

Google has updated its information website for its Glass Explorer programme to include a list of "dos and don'ts" for its head-mounted computers, including one rather unexpected admonition.

"[Don't] be creepy or rude," the last item on the list cautions, "(aka, a 'Glasshole')."

It's a surprising turn of phrase, coming from Google. The Chocolate Factory has been none too pleased with the popular nickname for wearers of its Android-powered specs – enough so that some Googlers have asked The Reg if it could please stop using "Glasshole" in headlines.

Rarin' to buy an Ubuntu phone? Maybe not until 2015, Canonical man says

Commercial smartphones running the mobile version of the Ubuntu Linux distro probably won't be available through carriers until 2015 at the earliest, a Canonical spokesman has revealed.

When Canonical CEO Jane Silber first announced plans to port Ubuntu to phones last year, she said the goal was to ship the first handsets with the OS preloaded by the end of 2013.

That didn't happen, and from the sound of it, Ubuntu fans probably shouldn't hold their breath for a dedicated Ubuntu phone this year, either. Even if one does appear, it will likely be a limited-run device targeting niche

Ubuntu Touch OS wins its first smartphone partner

Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth

Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth

(Credit: Stephen Shankland/CNET)

PARIS -- Ubuntu Touch has its first customer, CNET has learned.

Canonical has just signed its first deal to supply a smartphone with its mobile operating system, Canonical founder and product strategy leader Mark Shuttleworth revealed in an interview here at the LeWeb conference. He wouldn't say which company has agreed to use the Linux-based OS, but said it will be offered on high-end phones in 2014.

"We have concluded our first set of agreements to ship Ubuntu on mobile phones," Shuttleworth said.

'No permission' Android apps can see and share your data

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • "No-permission" Android apps can access potentially sensitive data on your phone
  • The bigger problem isn't malicious exploitation, but rather that app developers are "sloppy"
  • Don't install apps that require too many permissions, and report any suspicious activity



Editor's note:
Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

(CNN) -- Savvy Android users tend to be wary of installing apps that request seemingly unnecessary